"Yet even after the appearance of white explorers and settlers, little was discovered or recorded of any local tribal history ..."

"For at least 7,500 years, Aboriginal people have used La Perouse as a meeting or camping ground. Yet even after the appearance of white explorers and settlers, little was discovered or recorded of any local tribal history ... La Perouse ... in 1788 ... camped on the peninsula for six weeks ... After this limited contact, the Aboriginal population of the area was decimated by ... smallpox ... further record of Aboriginal habitation on the peninsula does not occur until 1880. By this time few local tribes people remained ... By 1885 a small Anglican mission was working at La Perouse, and an area of 7 acres had been officially gazetted as a 'Reserve for the Use of Aborigines'. It was government policy at this time to keep black and white populations separate, in the belief that the Aboriginal people were a doomed race and that assimilation was both impractical and undesirable. Segregation of the La Perouse population was controlled by missionaries, the police, and resident 'managers'. To control movement between the south coast tribes and their La Perouse kinsmen, the state-run Aborigines Protection Board refused to supply rations and fishing equipment to any but recognised locals. The Aborigines Protection Association ... had also begun general missionary work at La Perouse ... " [7]